Friday 25 January 2019

Great Opera Choruses

RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra

Time 7:30pm
National Concert Hall Dublin

Tickets:

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FEATURING
  • Ted Sperling
    conductor
  • Andrew Foster-Williams
    bass-baritone
  • RTÉ Philharmonic Choir
EVENT INFO
Programme:
  • INCLUDING
  • VERDI

    Nabucco ‘Va, pensiero’ (Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves)

  • VERDI

    Macbeth Witches’ Chorus

  • VERDI

    Otello ‘Credo in un Dio crudel’

  • WAGNER

    Tannhäuser Pilgrim’s Chorus

  • MUSSORGSKY

    Boris Godunov Coronation Scene

  • LEONCAVALLO

    Pagliacci Bell Chorus

  • PUCCINI

    Madame Butterfly Humming Chorus

  • GOUNOD

    Faust ‘Gloire immortelle de nos aIeux’ (Soldier’s Chorus)

  • TCHAIKOVSKY

    Eugene Onegin Waltz Scene

  • VERDI

    Aida Triumphal Scene

  • VERDI

    Il trovatore Anvil Chorus

  • PUCCINI

    Tosca ‘Te Deum’

Want something more from opera than tragic heroines who die just as you get to know them? Show-off solo voices just don’t do it for you? Then you need to get to know the real un-sung (but singing!) stars of opera: the chorus.

An evening of massed voices sees the wonderful (even if we say it ourselves) RTÉ Philharmonic Choir taking centre stage to show off their amazing talents in some of opera’s most magnificent and moving choruses.

A Russian Tsar, Egyptian Pharaoh, Scottish king and a broken-hearted clown step aside to make room for more witches than you might care to meet, pilgrims aplenty, soldiers, slaves, geishas and gypsy blacksmiths (no, really!).

And, OK, we confess, there’s a couple of ill-fated leading ladies (#tragicheroine) and a scheming villain (#boohiss) in the mix, but if you thought victorious voices at Croke Park was the ultimate thrill, then you haven’t heard Verdi’s stirring Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves and thumping Anvil Chorus or the adrenaline rush of Gounod’s spine-stiffening Soldier’s Chorus.

But it’s not all about macho bravado. Let your inner poet delight in Leoncavallo’s Bell Chorus, blissfully surrender to Puccini’s Humming Chorus and take suspicious amounts of pleasure in Verdi’s Witches’ Chorus.

Did we say there was something for everyone here? We should have!