Tuesday 25 June

Summer Lunchtime

RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra

Time 1:05pm
National Concert Hall Dublin

Tickets: €12

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FEATURING
  • Gavin Maloney
    conductor
  • Amy Gillen
    flute
  • Liz Nolan, RTÉ lyric fm
    presenter
EVENT INFO
Programme:
  • Hérold

    Overture to Zampa

  • Debussy

    Sarabande (orch. Ravel)

  • Ibert

    Hommage à Mozart

  • Chaminade

    Flute Concertino

  • Delibes

    Prelude and Mazurka, Entr’acte and Waltz from Coppélia

  • Berlioz

    Overture to Le carnaval romain

With summer at some sort of height, take a moment to unwind and relax with an all-too fleeting musical journey to France. The Sir James Galway Rising Star Award-winner and the Irish Freemason’s Young Musician of the Year, flute virtuoso Amy Gillen, is our soloist.

The animated Overture to Zampa, Ferdinand Hérold’s piratical parody of Mozart’s Don Giovanni, gets proceedings off to a animated, salty start, the elder titan receiving fuller tribute in Jacques Ibert’s spirited orchestral showpiece brimming over with wit and warmth, Hommage à Mozart.

The ‘slow and solemn elegance’ of Claude Debussy’s Sarabande is lent a becomingly grave poetry in Maurice Ravel’s richly orchestrated arrangement while Cécile Chaminade’s pretty and perfumed Concertino puts the solo flute through its paces to lithe and lyrical effect.

From one of the all-time great ballets, Leo Delibes’ Coppélia, a magical tale of a doll brought to life, the glittering ‘Prélude and Mazurka’ and free-flowing, light-as-air ‘Entr’acte and Waltz’ conjure a timeless fantasy with music of bewitching delicacy and infectious joie de vivre.

Borrowing themes from his disastrously received first opera, Benvenuto Cellini, Berlioz’s concert overture Le carnival romain (‘Roman Carnival’) is a scintillating exercise in spinning silk from what was considered to be the proverbial pig’s ear. Making thrilling use of themes, melodies and orchestrations previously dismissed as suspiciously novel, too difficult for musicians and too challenging for audiences, it exploits the orchestra’s various sections with vital, vivacious Gallic flair.